The concept of social awareness is fairly simple; it’s a person’s ability to consider the perspectives of other individuals, groups, or communities, and apply that understanding to interactions with them.
 

Although the definition of social awareness is fairly succinct, it’s a nuanced skill that develops significantly throughout childhood. In fact, most people acknowledge that being ‘socially aware’ is something that continues to hone throughout adult life; as we’re introduced to new information and experiences that require us to understand the views and standpoints of others.

As we grow, social awareness skills and societal awareness helps us to understand how one fits into and contributes to the community and the world, as well as how we get what we need from the world.

In the long term, social awareness skills will help us understand professionalism in the workplace, as well as making it easier to share information, communicate, and collaborate with others. From a personal point of view, social awareness is a fundamental part of creating friendships and relationships – helping us to lead happy and fulfilled lives.

Social Awareness is also known as The ability to take the perspective of and empathize with others, including those from diverse backgrounds and cultures. The ability to understand social and ethical norms for behavior and to recognize family, school, and community resources and supports.
Social awareness requires staff and educators to acknowledge, value, support, and respond to the cultural values, traditions, communication, learning styles, contributions, and relational patterns of all students in the classroom. As school districts locally select, develop, prepare and deliver their own curricula, they may want to consider modifying their curricula to critique and redress issues of privilege and bias (e.g., sexism, ageism, ableism, racism, and heteronormative stereotypes).
It is also important that students and educators:
• Understand their own cultural identity and its implications in interactions and toward school.
• Possess an affirming attitude toward all students.
• Develop constructive ways of engaging each other’s practical knowledge.
• Appreciate multiple and diverse perspectives in the classroom.
• Examine the systemic structures and ideologies that justify inequalities.
• Critically reflect on the socio-historic legacy of groups of people not benefitting from and being oppressed by U.S. public systems.
• Acknowledge, value, support, and respond to the cultural values, traditions, communication, learning styles, contributions, and relational patterns of all students in the classroom.

My role here is to help you reaching the emotional level of communication starting from the very simple daily life situations till the lack of emotional communication that we might have with a friend or a neighbor or a colleague or even a family member.

I wish all good on the social level of your life!

Nour